This New York Times Article Is A Godsend For Restaurants And Suppliers

Written by

“I mean, come on. How many months of the year can you harvest tomatoes in New York?” Anonymous Source

We heard this hard truth recently while talking to a restaurant manager who works for a “farm-to-table” branded establishment in DC. They were lamenting the fact that diners–especially those that purport to be extremely concerned with the food system–can’t seem to understand that ingredients they want year-round may not be available in the dead of winter. 

Here’s the problem: People have been fed the phrase “farm-to-table” so many times they have a completely unrealistic view of a healthy food system. To them, the gold standard is a Point of Sale system whereby they ask for a crunchy salad and some guy starts shouting out the back window “HEY JOEY, PICK ME TWO BUNCHES OF KALE, AND SOMEONE SHAKE THAT ALMOND TREE, STAT!” And they want that to happen from New Years to Christmas, with maybe a few squash-based dishes thrown in around Autumn.

Americans have been duped, and the restaurant industry is in the unenviable position of having to build its business around the lie that food is best for us and the environment when the time between picking and plating is as short as possible. Everyone who actually works in this industry knows that is just not true. A sustainable food system is one that works within the constraints of growing seasons, perishability, and changing tastes by preserving food that won’t be used right away. 

Lucky for us, the New York Times just basically put a stamp of approval on a practice that, let’s be honest, doesn’t need the New York Times’ approval, but could sure use a little extra legitimacy among foodie types. The controversial process they are giving the thumbs up? Freezing food.

Somehow consumers have collectively decided that any form of preservation is bad, and labels on everything from coconut water to t-bones flaunt “Never Frozen” as if the process of making food very, very cold were akin to dragging it through the Port-A-Potty at a Metallica concert. Guess what dining public? Not only is freezing ingredients good for food and the environment, but your favorite restaurant may already be doing it, and you probably never knew the difference!

So, shout it from the rooftops, food industry friends. You can freeze things and still serve them “fresh”. In fact, if we want to cut food waste and do right by seasonal growing strategies, it just may be the best thing you can do. Here’s the link to make your case. Tweet it from the rooftops: 

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/08/dining/food-preservation-freezing.html?_r=0.

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter to stay up to date with all of the latest tips and trends in food tech.

Check your inbox to confirm your subscription
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

You Might Also Like

What's BlueCart?

One Click Ordering

Order from any of your suppliers on the web or right from your phone. Get push notifications for cut-off's and order statuses.

Inventory

Manage and archive your inventory levels right from your phone or computer. Place orders instantly and easily when you're running low.

Order Check-in

Check in your deliveries as soon as the truck arrives and instantly update your suppliers on any mistakes or damaged items.

Get Started
Sell Smarter

Accept online & mobile ordering to all of your customers and personalize products and pricing for each. Know exactly when they go inactive.

Promote Specials

Increase your sales by promoting weekly specials that are advertised to your buyers through an email and the BlueCart platform.

Automated Analytics

View sales and profit data to ensure you're always trending upward. You can also export live custom data, fulfillment reports, and pick tickets with ease!

Get Started