In Search of the Best Restaurant Apps: ChefsFeed

We’re Looking for the Best Apps for Restaurants (Besides BlueCart)…

ChefsFeed

Ever read a review of your restaurant that went like this: 

“What a rip-off. The ‘steak’ fries were actually just really big french fries.” 

Or maybe: 

“I’m pretty much a sandwich connoisseur, but gotta say I don’t really understand pickles…”

Yeah, those are the kinds of incredible insights that restaurants open themselves up to when the general public gets to have their say online. But what if you could direct potential customers toward an app / website that hosted reviews from people who actually knew what they were talking about? And what if those experts followed your mom’s number one rule of speaking (If you don’t have anything nice to say…)?

You can, and they do. It’s called ChefsFeed, and it’s a beautiful thing.

We first came across this tool while researching famed Minneapolis restaurant The Bachelor Farmer, popular for its Scandinavian fare. ChefsFeed allows the chef – in this case, you – to share positive dining experiences with the masses, and in doing so, simultaneously promotes the reviewed restaurant, while also building up the chef (celeb?) cred of the reviewer. Consider it the LinkedIn for chefs, with a consumer-facing twist.

Patrons can learn about you and your restaurant(s) by way of a consolidated page which lists your hospitality accolades and past recommendations all in one place. Chefs trading positive reviews and bonafide endorsements? That’s some solid kitchen karma.  

We particularly love the site’s dynamic search feature. Chef and guest alike can pick through ChefsFeed across a number of dimensions: themed guides (“Best Hangover Food in Atlanta” is a useful one…), stories, location, videos, cuisine type, review, or chef.

Obviously, we love ChefsFeed, but maybe you’re looking for a review from a more authoritative figure…? 

Fine, the New York Times recently summarized the tool’s je ne sais quoi as “the element of ‘chef authority’” which until now has gone missing from competing dining review platforms. They went on to say ChefsFeed “has done a great job of (bringing) notable chefs like Daniel Boulud and Mario Batali” into the fold, and “the social element of the app” keeps chefs engaged with their digital followers, which means new recommendations are constantly being generated for foodies seeking out the next big restaurant in their city. 

The author’s final note: “I am certainly more inclined to trust a chef with a name (and a reputation to guard) than the anonymous grouch who gives a great cafe a low rating after having to wait five minutes for a table.” 

We couldn’t agree more.